Posts tagged with ‘Chicken Run’

 

Chickens roosting in the run at night rather than the henhouse?

Monday, November 23rd, 2020

Three of our coop designs (The Garden Loft, The Garden Coop, and The Garden Ark) have an integrated henhouse and run. So your chickens are free to move between the two areas as they wish. (You can add a door between them if you like.) In some cases, this means that your flock might choose to roost in the secure run at night, rather than inside the henhouse.

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Keeping bees with chickens

Monday, January 25th, 2016

Keeping bees and chickens in the same coop

Bryan in Atlanta sent in photos of his finished Garden Coop, which he expanded so that he could keep bees and chickens together. I found the idea fascinating, so I asked him to explain how his plan to incorporate a bee hive informed his chicken coop build. The rest of this post comes directly from him. . . .  (more…)

Make It Your Own: “Krewe of Coops” Virtual Chicken Coop Tour, No. 3

Tuesday, May 12th, 2015

In this third ride of the Krewe of Coops, we feature The Garden Ark mobile chicken coop design, with several examples from around the U.S. Enjoy the parade!

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Make It Your Own: Michelle’s “Hippie Chicks” Chicken Coop, Durham, North Carolina

Friday, March 20th, 2015

Hippie Chicks chicken coop from The Basic Coop plans
Michelle built this adorable North Carolina chicken coop using The Basic Coop plans and hardware kit. Her four chicks moved in in the fall, and she wrote recently to say that they made it through the cold, snowy winter with no issues — and no added light or heat (or lava lamps).  (more…)

Make It Your Own: Sandra and John’s Basic Coop, Layton, Utah

Saturday, October 25th, 2014

Basic Chicken Coop from Plans

Sandra and John used The Basic Coop stand-alone chicken coop plans to build this home for their mixed flock of standard and bantam hens in Utah. They made a few modifications to suit their needs:  (more…)

Make It Your Own: Rebecca’s Basic Coop and Run

Tuesday, September 30th, 2014

Basic plywood chicken coop built from plans.

Rebecca from just outside Philadelphia sent in a couple pictures of her new Basic Coop stand-alone chicken coop and attached run. I’m impressed by the height modification she made, her choice of siding and color, and the way she thought through the whole process to build a coop that would suit her needs. What’s even more impressive is that this is one of her first-ever building projects. The rest of the post comes directly from her. . .  (more…)

Make It Your Own: Bill and Chris’s Massachusetts Garden Coop

Wednesday, July 16th, 2014

Front view of Garden Coop with henhouse window and green trim.

Bill and Chris in Southeastern Massachusetts built a beautiful chicken coop using The Garden Coop plans. They sent us some nice pictures and a detailed description of all they did to make it their own. The rest of the post comes directly from Chris. . . .  (more…)

7 tips for building a garden-friendly chicken coop

Tuesday, July 15th, 2014

In the urban or suburban garden, limited space, pests, wary neighbors, and the like can make the idea of keeping chickens seem like more hassle than it’s worth. But by designing and building the right kind of coop, you can quickly get past these hurdles and add a whole new dimension to your garden.

Here are seven tips to put your coop project on the right path. . . .

1. Let it breathe.

Window on the front of Dan's Austin chicken coop.

A well-ventilated chicken coop helps keep your hens from suffering and your neighbors from complaining. Of course, you do need to stay ahead of any odors, making sure you balance out their poop with plenty of high-carbon bedding like straw, wood shavings, leaves, or shredded paper. We use the deep-litter method and continue to add straw as the chickens add droppings. This mixture begins to compost in place, and the volume builds only slowly. From time to time we move it all to a compost bin to finish doing its thing, then incorporate the rich fertilizer into the garden.

NOTE: The pictures in this post feature coops built by us and by customers of our chicken coop plans. Click on them to learn more about each DIY chicken coop build.

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Make It Your Own: Dale’s Decked Out Oregon Garden Coop

Tuesday, May 20th, 2014

Garden Coop with henhouse walls to the ground.

Dale sent us pictures of his amazing garden and chicken coop he built using The Garden Coop plans. Among many other additions, he built the henhouse walls to the ground on three sides, attached attractive outboard nesting boxes, and added rectangular windows to the henhouse. The rest of the post is from Dale. . .  (more…)

Make It Your Own: Breanna’s Sacramento Garden Coop with Extended Run

Wednesday, May 7th, 2014

Walk-in chicken coop made bigger with 12' extended run and outboard nesting boxes

Breanna in Sacramento, California, built this roomy chicken coop using The Garden Coop plans. She extended the run by twelve feet and added external nesting boxes to the hen house just left of the walk-in door. White paint and a well-placed tarp help keep her chickens cooler in the summer months.

Thanks to Breanna for sharing a picture of her chicken coop. If you like what she’s created, please let her know with a note below. And if you want to receive email notifications of future posts, subscribe to Coop Thoughts.

 

 

Make It Your Own: Christey’s Illinois Garden Coop with Eglu Cube Henhouse

Tuesday, March 4th, 2014

Modified chicken coop from Garden Coop plans with Eglu Cube henhouse and run added to each side.

Christey built this modified version of The Garden Coop just outside of Chicago, using her existing Eglu chicken coop as the henhouse and adding the Eglu run to the other side as additional space for her hens. She writes: (more…)

Make It Your Own: Susan’s Tennessee Garden Coop with an A-frame henhouse inside!

Thursday, February 20th, 2014

Chicken coop modified to include an existing a-frame mobile coop.

Susan at Gum Tree Farm in Tennessee already had a small mobile chicken coop, but was looking for a larger, more secure space to complete her chicken habitat. So she cleverly used The Garden Coop chicken coop plans to build a custom enclosure into which she installed her existing A-frame chicken coop for use as a henhouse.

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How to build grazing frames for your backyard chickens

Tuesday, February 7th, 2012

Free plans for backyard chicken frames to grow greens that will last for months.Allowing your chickens to graze on fresh grass is a good thing — not just for them, but for you as well. The nutrients in green vegetation enhances the quality of their eggs and meat. And since fresh greens can make up about 20-30% of a chicken’s diet, providing them for your chickens can save you on feed costs.

But keeping your chickens supplied with fresh greens can be a challenge. When chickens have plenty of room to roam, they will graze a little off the top, then move on. When forage space is limited, however, as in a small urban or suburban backyard, chickens will continue to graze and scratch in the same spot until the vegetation is torn down to the roots.

An easy solution? Grazing frames! (more…)

How to wrap your chicken coop for the winter

Friday, November 25th, 2011

The Garden Coop chicken coop design wrapped in plastic for the rainy winter seasonFor the past few winters, I’ve wrapped our Garden Coop in plastic sheeting to keep driving rain and snow (mostly rain here in the Pacific Northwest) out of the run area.

I’d love to say I do this for artistic reasons, à la Christo, but it’s really all about practicality. Plastic film is inexpensive, easy to put up, and keeps your hens dry and happy. And in the spring, you can just take it down, roll it up, and store it out of the way.

There are other solutions, of course — sheet siding, acrylic panels, canvas, landscape fabric. Let me know in the comments what has worked for you. (more…)

Winter Chicken Coop Care, Pt. 2: How chickens keep themselves warm — and how you can help them.

Monday, November 15th, 2010

This is the second in a four-part series on preparing your backyard chickens and coop for cold weather.

Most standard laying hens are quite cold hardy (check this handy breed chart). Just look at their names: Plymouth Rock, Rhode Island Red, New Hampshire Red. . . . These girls were bred to withstand cold climates well before the advent of electric heat. So how do they manage to withstand temperatures that send us scampering for the nearest cup of cocoa? (more…)